Introverts, in contrast, may have strong social skills and enjoy parties and business meetings, but after a while wish they were home in their pajamas. They prefer to devote their social energies to close friends, colleagues, and family. They listen more than they talk, think before they speak, and often feel as if they express themselves better in writing than in conversation. They tend to dislike conflict. Many have a horror of small talk, but enjoy deep discussions.
—Susan Cain, "Quiet"

Photography. Maps. Architecture. Lego.
Always have music in the background.
Turtles are an instant reblog.
america-wakiewakie:

World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera
Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.
In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.
It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.
The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.
But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.
In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.
(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

america-wakiewakie:

World Bank Wants Water Privatized, Despite Risk | Al Jazeera

Humans can survive weeks without food, but only days without water — in some conditions, only hours. It may sound clichéd, but it’s no hyperbole: Water is life. So what happens when private companies control the spigot? Evidence from water privatization projects around the world paints a pretty clear picture — public health is at stake.

In the run-up to its annual spring meeting this month, the World Bank Group, which offers loans, advice and other resources to developing countries, held four days of dialogues in Washington, D.C. Civil society groups from around the world and World Bank Group staff convened to discuss many topics. Water was high on the list.

It’s hard to think of a more important topic. We face a global water crisis, made worse by the warming temperatures of climate change. A quarter of the world’s people don’t have sufficient access to clean drinking water, and more people die every year from waterborne illnesses — such as cholera and typhoid fever — than from all forms of violence, including war, combined. Every hour, the United Nations estimates, 240 babies die from unsafe water.

The World Bank Group pushes privatization as a key solution to the water crisis. It is the largest funder of water management in the developing world, with loans and financing channeled through the group’s International Finance Corporation (IFC). Since the 1980s, the IFC has been promoting these water projects as part of a broader set of privatization policies, with loans and financing tied to enacting austerity measures designed to shrink the state, from the telecom industry to water utilities.

But international advocacy and civil society groups point to the pockmarked record of private-sector water projects and are calling on the World Bank Group to end support for private water.

In the decades since the IFC’s initial push, we have seen the results of water privatization: It doesn’t work. Water is not like telecommunications or transportation. You could tolerate crappy phone service, but have faulty pipes connecting to your municipal water and you’re in real trouble. Water is exceptional.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: ZME Science)

Tuesday, 15 April 2014

You have to be delusional for the illusion to come true.

That’s where I went wrong!

Monday, 14 April 2014
paigethenotebook:

tim4eus:

catsforlivvy:

idratherdreamofjune:

softdespair:

join-they-said:

Russian medical record written in cursive

you say russian and i raise you chinese


*gasp of horror*

OHMYGOD STOP.

alright but

Hebrew tho

i refuse to believe any of this translates to anything

Still more legible than my writing.

paigethenotebook:

tim4eus:

catsforlivvy:

idratherdreamofjune:

softdespair:

join-they-said:

Russian medical record written in cursive

you say russian and i raise you chinese

Chinese doctors' handwriting

*gasp of horror*

OHMYGOD STOP.

alright but

Hebrew tho

i refuse to believe any of this translates to anything

Still more legible than my writing.

catsbeaversandducks:

Meerkats make the best photographer’s assistants EVER.

Via BuzzFeed

Sunday, 13 April 2014

I'm back.

travellerfangirl:

Hi guys!

I’m not sure if I dare to come back here after leaving for such a long time. Maybe post-travel depression got me too hard, I don’t know. But I’m sorry, I promise to answer to your many, many asks soon, even though I’m not sure if it matters to you anymore. Sorry.

But.

I’m here with…

Lakehead kind of isn’t anywhere near Toronto… Unless you’re going to the Orillia campus.

ridge:

i love learning useless information 

Umm…
10/4/1411/4/1412/4/1413/4/1414/4/1415/4/1416/4/1417/4/1418/4/1419/4/14

ridge:

i love learning useless information 

Umm…

10/4/14
11/4/14
12/4/14
13/4/14
14/4/14
15/4/14
16/4/14
17/4/14
18/4/14
19/4/14

queenamidalek:

faiscequetupeux:

queenamidalek:

Today sucked.

Me too. Tomorrow will be better for sure.

It was. It was SO much better. :)

Hooray!

 
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